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Water quality reports

The federal government created the Safe Drinking Water Act to ensure that drinking water supplied to the public is safe. We take these regulations seriously and are committed to providing high-quality tap water to Southern Nevada residents.

Our drinking water meets or surpasses all federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In fact, our water is tested more thoroughly and frequently than most bottled water.

2017 water quality reports

Each year, the Las Vegas Valley Water District produces a water quality report for each of our service areas. View the reports for an overview of your water sources and quality:

2016 reports (archive)

If you have questions about water quality in the valley, call the Water Quality Division at 702-258-3215.

If you are not a Las Vegas Valley Water District customer, please contact your water provider for water quality information. If you're unsure who your water provider is, use our Find Your Water Provider.

Water quality summaries

The following water quality summaries contain additional data and information about water quality for each of our service areas, including all monitoring results:

Water quality laws protect public health

Our drinking water meets or surpasses all of the standards contained in the Safe Drinking Water Act, a federal law designed to ensure that the drinking water supplied to the American public is safe.

Under this law, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets standards that water system providers across the nation must follow.

The Nevada Bureau of Safe Drinking Water administers and enforces the Nevada Safe Drinking Water Program, and is responsible for making sure that the Las Vegas Valley Water District follows the requirements of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act.

The U.S. EPA, in turn, monitors the state's drinking water program to ensure that the state is fulfilling its responsibilities.

The water supply is analyzed for:

  • Metals and other inorganic chemicals
  • Radiological constituents
  • Bacteria
  • Viruses
  • Protozoans (such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia)
  • Organic chemicals

Assessments help protect water sources

The Safe Drinking Water Act requires states to develop and implement source water assessments to analyze existing and potential threats to the quality of drinking water throughout the state.

In these assessments, the state:

  • Identifies the sources of public drinking water.
  • Inventories potential sources of contamination.
  • Assesses how vulnerable the water source is to the contamination sources.
  • Informs the public of the results.

The results of these assessments are summarized below for each water system managed by the Las Vegas Valley Water District.

Detailed information about the findings of each source water assessment is available for viewing in person weekdays, by appointment, at the Las Vegas Valley Water District, 1001 S. Valley View Blvd. Please call 702-258-3215 for an appointment.

Additional information about the Nevada Source Water Assessment Program may be found at ndep.nv.gov.

Results of the source water assessment for the Big Bend Water District were most recently provided by the state of Nevada in 2004 and are summarized here.

The Big Bend Water District utilizes a surface water intake in the Colorado River below Davis Dam. The surface water intake is considered moderately vulnerable to contamination from volatile organic chemicals originating from boat exhausts. There is a moderate to low risk for asbestos to contaminate the drinking water because portions of the water distribution system have been constructed using asbestos cement pipe. The Big Bend Water District is in compliance with all state and federal Safe Drinking Water Act requirements.

Detailed information pertaining to the findings of the source water assessment is available for viewing in person weekdays, by appointment, at the Las Vegas Valley Water District, 1001 S. Valley View Blvd. Please call 702-258-3215 for an appointment. Additional information about the Nevada Source Water Assessment Program may be found at ndep.nv.gov.

Results of the source water assessment for the Blue Diamond Water System were most recently provided by the state of Nevada in 2016 and are summarized here.

The water supplied by the Blue Diamond Water System is purchased from Certain Teed Gypsum Public Water System and comes from two wells that are recharged from precipitation and snowmelt runoff in the Wilson Cliff/Red Rock Canyon and Mount Potosi area. Potential contaminants are few because the watershed is within the Red Rock Canyon Conservation Area.

The wells supplying water to the Blue Diamond service area were reassessed in 2016 for potential vulnerability to volatile organic (VOC), synthetic organic (SOC), inorganic (IOC), radiological and microbiological contaminants, and are again considered to have low vulnerability to all of these contaminants. The drinking water supplied to the Blue Diamond Water System is in compliance with all state and federal Safe Drinking Water Act standards.

Detailed information pertaining to the findings of the source water assessment is available for viewing in person weekdays, by appointment, at the Las Vegas Valley Water District, 1001 S. Valley View Blvd. Please call 702-258-3215 for an appointment. Additional information about the Nevada Source Water Assessment Program may be found at ndep.nv.gov.

Results of the source water assessment for the Jean Water System were most recently provided by the state of Nevada in 2016 and are summarized here.

The Jean Water System service area is supplied by three wells in the Ivanpah Valley. The groundwater comes from the Ivanpah Valley aquifer, which is recharged from the southern end of the Spring Mountains and the New York Mountains.

The wells supplying water to the Jean service area were reassessed in 2016 for potential vulnerability to volatile organic (VOC), synthetic organic (SOC), inorganic (IOC), radiological and microbiological contaminants. The Jean Utility Services Inc. Public Water System is considered to have moderate vulnerability to radionuclide contamination because radionuclides have been detected; however, this radioactivity is likely naturally occurring and not from a contaminant source. The aquifer has elevated levels of naturally occurring arsenic and therefore the system is considered to have a high vulnerability to arsenic contamination. The water system blends all water sources to ensure arsenic levels remain below the maximum contamination level of 0.01 milligrams per liter. Portions of the distribution system between the wells and the mixing tank have been constructed using asbestos cement pipe (ACP). Therefore, the system is considered to have moderate vulnerability to asbestos contamination, and asbestos monitoring at the mixing tank will continue. The Jean Water System is in compliance with all state and federal Safe Drinking Water Act requirements.

Detailed information pertaining to the findings of the source water assessment is available for viewing in person weekdays, by appointment, at the Las Vegas Valley Water District, 1001 S. Valley View Blvd. Please call 702-258-3215 for an appointment. Additional information about the Nevada Source Water Assessment Program may be found at ndep.nv.gov.

Results of the source water assessment for the Kyle Canyon Water District were most recently provided by the state of Nevada in 2016 and are summarized here.

Four wells supply water to two portions of the Kyle Canyon Water District. The two Echo Wells supply water primarily to the Old Town, Cathedral Rock and Echo View areas. Rainbow Well serves primarily the Rainbow View area. These wells derive water from the bedrock aquifer, which is recharged by runoff from precipitation and snowmelt.

The wells supplying water to the Kyle Canyon service area were reassessed in 2016 for potential vulnerability to volatile organic (VOC), synthetic organic (SOC), inorganic (IOC), radiological and microbiological contaminants. The aquifer is considered to have a moderate risk for VOC contamination due to xylene and ethylbenzene contamination detected in one of the wells. However, there are no potential contaminant sources for VOC contamination within the 10-year capture zone of this well (3,000 feet from the well head). The aquifer is considered to have a moderate risk for microbiological contamination because all four wells are located in residential areas utilizing septic systems. The Kyle Canyon Water District public water system is in compliance with all state and federal Safe Drinking Water Act requirements.

Detailed information pertaining to the findings of the source water assessment is available for viewing in person weekdays, by appointment, at the Las Vegas Valley Water District, 1001 S. Valley View Blvd. Please call 702-258-3215 for an appointment. Additional information about the Nevada Source Water Assessment Program may be found at ndep.nv.gov.

Results of the source water assessment for the Las Vegas Valley Water District were most recently provided by the state of Nevada in 2003 and are summarized here.

The Las Vegas Valley Water District (LVVWD) operates 66 supply wells capable of providing water to the distribution system. However, most of the water delivered to LVVWD consumers is treated surface water from the Colorado River system drawn from two intakes at Lake Mead.

The surface water source assessment includes an analysis of the current water-quality data at the intakes and the vulnerability of the intakes to potential contaminating activities located within the Las Vegas Valley watershed. The vulnerability analysis includes the time of travel from potential contaminating activities to the intakes, physical barrier effectiveness of the watershed, the risk associated with the potential contaminating activities and evaluation of historical water-quality data prior to treatment. It is noteworthy that this study represents an initial survey of the drinking-water intakes' vulnerability and is based on land use in the watershed rather than an analysis of the drinking water. Even before undergoing treatment, water quality at the intakes is within state and federal drinking water standards except for microbiological contaminants naturally found in all surface waters.

The vulnerability analysis of land use shows that the potential contaminating activities with the highest vulnerability rating include septic systems, golf courses/parks, storm channels, gasoline stations, auto repair shops, construction and wastewater treatment plant discharges. Based on water-quality data (prior to treatment) and the results of the vulnerability analysis of potential contaminating activities, the drinking water intake is at a moderate level of risk for volatile organic (VOC), synthetic organic (SOC), microbiological and radiological contaminants and at a high level of risk for inorganic (IOC) contaminants. All of the Las Vegas Valley governmental agencies coordinate their watershed management programs to minimize the vulnerability risk to Lake Mead. The findings of the source water assessment will be used to enhance those programs.

LVVWD's groundwater wells were also assessed for potential vulnerability for VOC, SOC, IOC, radionuclide and microbiological contamination. The LVVWD's wells are considered to be moderately vulnerable to VOC and SOC contamination. Vulnerability to radionuclide, IOC and microbiological contamination is considered low. The LVVWD's groundwater supply includes wells drilled into the Las Vegas Valley Groundwater Aquifer, which is approximately 300 feet below ground level throughout the valley. There are potential contaminant sources near or upgradient of LVVWD wells, including: auto repair shops, gasoline stations, other businesses and homeowners. The LVVWD has conducted many years of monitoring for all drinking water contaminant groups. Although some analyses have indicated low levels of organic contaminants, in no instance did concentrations exceed state or federal standards. In most cases, the detections were one-time occurrences.

The treated water delivered by the Las Vegas Valley Water District meets or surpasses all state and federal Safe Drinking Water Act requirements.

Detailed information pertaining to the findings of the source water assessment is available for viewing in person weekdays, by appointment, at the Las Vegas Valley Water District, 1001 S. Valley View Blvd. Please call 702-258-3215 for an appointment. Additional information about the Nevada Source Water Assessment Program may be found at ndep.nv.gov.

Results of the source water assessment for the Searchlight Water System were most recently provided by the state of Nevada in 2016 and are summarized here.

The Searchlight Water System service area is supplied by three wells in Piute Valley. The wells in Searchlight are recharged by precipitation and snowmelt runoff from the Lucy Gray Range, the Castle Mountains and the McCullough Mountains, as well as from groundwater flows from the adjacent up-gradient valley.

The wells supplying water to the Searchlight service area were reassessed in 2016 for potential vulnerability to volatile organic (VOC), synthetic organic (SOC), inorganic (IOC), radiological and microbiological contaminants. Two of the three wells are considered to be moderately vulnerable to VOC contamination because of VOC detections during routine Safe Drinking Water Act monitoring. The Searchlight Water System is considered to have moderate vulnerability to radionuclide contamination because gross alpha particles have been detected at or above 50% of the maximum contaminant level; however, this radioactivity is likely naturally occurring and not from a contaminant source. Two of the three wells have elevated levels of naturally occurring arsenic and therefore the system is considered to have a high vulnerability to arsenic contamination. The water system has installed an arsenic treatment facility to provide safe drinking water to the water users. The Searchlight Water System is in compliance with all state and federal Safe Drinking Water Act requirements.

Detailed information pertaining to the findings of the source water assessment is available for viewing in person weekdays, by appointment, at the Las Vegas Valley Water District, 1001 S. Valley View Blvd. Please call 702-258-3215 for an appointment. Additional information about the Nevada Source Water Assessment Program may be found at ndep.nv.gov.